Category: Archeology

Dead Sea Scrolls online after high-tech photo process

Dead Sea Scrolls The Dead Sea Scrolls, which include the world’s oldest known biblical manuscripts, are now available online through a cooperative effort between the Israel Museum, where they are housed, and Google.

The Dead Seas Scrolls Digital Project will allow users to examine the Second Temple-era manuscripts at an unprecedented level of detail

Archaeologists find wooden Stonehenge

Archaeologists say they have discovered a monument similar to Stonehenge near the ancient British stone circle, dubbing it the most exciting find at the site for 50 years.

The structure is said to be like a wooden version of the world-famous collection of giant stones on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, south-west England.

“This is probably the first major ceremonial monument that has been found in the past 50 years or so,” said Vince Gaffney, a professor from the University of Birmingham, who is leading the archaeological dig. “It will completely change the way we think about the landscape around Stonehenge.”

Manuscript found in Ethiopian monastery could be world’s oldest illustrated Christian work

A manuscript found in a remote Ethiopian monastery could be the oldest illustrated Christian work in the world, experts have claimed.

Originally thought to be from around the 11th century, new carbon dating techniques place the Garima Gospels between 330 and 650 AD.

The 1,600 year-old texts are named after a monk, Abba Garima, who arrived in Ethiopia in the fifth century.

According to legend, he copied out the Gospels in just one day after founding the Garima Monastery, near Adwa in the north of the country.

Pagan altar found at Israel construction site

Pagan altar Israel on Thursday announced the discovery of a 2,000-year-old pagan altar at the site where plans for a new hospital wing have come under fire from ultra-Orthodox Jews who fear bones found there may be of Jews.

It was discovered as the IAA was overseeing development of a hospital wing designed to withstand rockets fired from the nearby Gaza Strip by Palestinian militants.

NY case spotlights Dead Sea Scrolls, fake e-mails

Dead Sea Scrolls Students and university officials started getting e-mails last year in which a prominent Judaic studies scholar seemed to make a startling confession: He had committed plagiarism.

The messages, it turned out, were a hoax. Prosecutors filed criminal charges, saying a lawyer sent the messages to tarnish the professor, his father’s rival.

The court case has drawn attention to issues both ancient (the origin of the Dead Sea Scrolls) and decidedly modern (phony online identities).

Islam vs. Archeology

Madain Saleh RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — Much of the world knows Petra, the ancient ruin in modern-day Jordan that is celebrated in poetry as “the rose-red city, ‘half as old as time,'” and which provided the climactic backdrop for “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.”

But far fewer know Madain Saleh, a similarly spectacular treasure built by the same civilization, the Nabateans.

That’s because it’s in Saudi Arabia, where conservatives are deeply hostile to pagan, Jewish and Christian sites that predate the founding of Islam in the 7th century.

But now, in a quiet but notable change of course, the kingdom has opened up an archaeology boom by allowing Saudi and foreign archaeologists to explore cities and trade routes long lost in the desert.

Israel to Display the Dead Sea Scrolls on the Internet

Israel to Display the Dead Sea Scrolls on the Internet JERUSALEM €” In a crowded laboratory painted in gray and cooled like a cave, half a dozen specialists embarked this week on a historic undertaking: digitally photographing every one of the thousands of fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls with the aim of making the entire file €” among the most sought-after and examined documents on earth €” available to all on the Internet.

Tablet ignites debate on messiah and resurrection

A tablet with 87 lines of Hebrew that scholars believe dates from the decades just before the birth of Jesus is causing a quiet stir in biblical and archaeological circles, especially because it may speak of a messiah who will rise from the dead after three days.

According to this article, “If such a messianic description really is there, it will contribute to a developing re-evaluation of both popular and scholarly views of Jesus, since it suggests that the story of his death and resurrection was not unique but part of a recognized Jewish tradition at the time.”

Yet the Old Testament includes hundreds of prophecies regarding the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.