Tag: Religious Merchandising

Christian gamers create themes to reflect beliefs

ATLANTA — “Grand Theft Auto” has been impounded in the Gardner household. So have 1,000 other video games filled with debauchery, decadence and carnage. Today this family’s interactive entertainment is far more divine. Electronic Bible games loaded with tests and trivia. Digital duels between David and Goliath. Adventures and challenges with pious themes where any violence appears virtuous. Hallelujah! At last! “It wasn’t easy, but (my children) realize the violence and the things they saw wouldn’t help them in life,” said Janice Gardner, mother of three boys and two girls ranging in age from 25 to 11. “We’re down to

‘Left Behind’ producers use church screenings to plug DVD sales

LOS ANGELES — The filmmakers of “Left Behind: World at War” figured a little preaching to the choir would help market the Christian-themed thriller. They preceded the movie’s DVD release Tuesday with screenings at about 3,200 churches across the United States and Canada, hoping to build word-of-mouth for the straight-to-video sequel in Kirk Cameron’s series of films about Armageddon. Cloud Ten Pictures, which produces the “Left Behind” movies, did not yet have attendance estimates on how many people caught “World at War” during the weekend screenings. But the company went into the weekend projecting as many as 1.8 million people

Time for Jesus Inc.: Christian offerings go mainstream

The Christian video game industry has a heavy cross to bear. A small customer base, even smaller development budgets and competition from a mainstream market that sells violent games by the truckload has traditionally meant spiritual gaming barely registered a blip on the national radar. But a growing mainstream fascination with divine entertainment has a variety of companies hoping to cash in big on Christian video games. “Right now the . . . industry is just ready to explode,” said Ralph Bagley, chief spokesman for the Christian Game Developers Association and often called the “Godfather” of Christian video games. Christian

French shoes with Lord Rama’s image annoys UK Hindus

A French footwear company has recently managed to offend just about every member of the UK’s Hindu community. So how did they manage this feat? By selling shoes with an image of Lord Rama imprinted on them. Now it is not unusual to see Hindu images and deities on T-shirts and the like in Britain and elsewhere, but this latest manifestation is a step too far. See Also Thailand Blasts Victoria’s Secret for New Buddha Swimsuit Thongs with religious icons invite Hindu ire Some Hawai’i Buddhists protest over naming of new Waikiki bar Indian deities, western products: Ignorance or crass

Video games with a Christian spin

San Anselmo firm offers alternative to violence-filled products Sick of seeing a video game market dominated by violence and sex, a group of Marin Christians are looking to bring God to gamers. Virtue Games, a fledgling, San Anselmo-based maker of Christian-themed computer games, hopes to fill a void in the increasingly salacious video game sector, according to company President Rick Tewell. With adventure games that center on Christian stories or allegories with Christian undertones, Virtue hopes to improve what has been a Christian game market mired in mediocrity, he said. See Also A Youth Movement in Christian Goods: Games, books,

Prayer candles are popular, even with non-believers

CHICAGO – Several weeks after it first appeared, the Virgin Mary-like salt stain on the wall of an underpass in Chicago continues to draw scores of visitors — and almost as many tall glass candles. But these aren’t just any candles. These are a 20th-century invention that has become the official beacon of makeshift memorials and vigils. They come out for everything from miraculous sightings and missing children to neighborhood tragedies and anti-war demonstrations. More commonly, though, they are lit in the home to accompany a specific petition to a higher authority. Known as prayer candles, seven-day candles or, in

Designers cater to those of faith…

Wearing their hearts on their sleeves Designers cater to those of faith and those who just want to be hip NEW YORK – Late last week, Trapper Blu, a ski and snowboarding instructor from Wanship, Utah, dropped in with his family at Christopher’s, a T-shirt shop in Greenwich Village, and tried on a shirt emblazoned with an image of Jesus and the slogan “Put Down the Drugs and Come Get a Hug.” “I would wear this, you bet,” Blu, 23, said, scrutinizing his reflection in the mirror. “The shirt is funny,” he added, as he tweaked the brim of his

Selling, the sole objective: Maximizing the Mormon marketing experience

Five days after the nation’s Mormon faithful congregate at the annual conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, another flock of Mormon faithful will assemble at the sprawling South Towne Exposition Center in Sandy. But they won’t be discussing weighty matters of church doctrine and theology, like delegates to the conference this weekend. The 200-plus wholesalers rendezvousing at the LDS Booksellers Association’s annual wholesale seminar Friday will ponder how to package their faith into a line of products that will sell to the church’s 11 million members worldwide. So far, insiders say, they haven’t been very successful.

Do God and money mix?

CNBC examines the growing business of evangelical Christianity Evangelicalism is one of the fastest-growing religious movements in the United States, and now this ardent form of Christianity is starting to flex its economic muscles. In Corporate America, the religion’s growing status is seen in all kinds of businesses. From health clubs to Hollywood movies, and from publishing companies to pizza parlors, firms around the United States are now saying they have Christian values at their core. “Jesus is big business in America,” explains Laura Nash, Ph.D., a senior research fellow at Harvard Business School. In fact, Jesus has always been

Wearing Their Beliefs on Their Chests

Late last week, Trapper Blu, a ski and snowboarding instructor from Wanship, Utah, dropped in with his family at Christopher’s, a T-shirt shop in Greenwich Village, and tried on a shirt emblazoned with an image of Jesus and the slogan “Put Down the Drugs and Come Get a Hug.” “I would wear this, you bet,” Mr. Blu, 23, said, scrutinizing his reflection in the mirror. “The shirt is funny,” he added, as he tweaked the brim of his cowboy hat, “but it doesn’t make fun of Jesus or anything.” A few blocks south at Urban Outfitters, part of a youth-oriented