Baby Trafficking Probe Church Strengthens Grip

Cult Warning Over ‘Miracles’

A controversial church being investigated over child trafficking allegations is experiencing a renaissance in Liverpool.

The city branch of the Gilbert Deya Ministries wound down its activities after the organisation was caught up in a baby kidnapping scandal.

Mary Deya, the wife of its leader, archbishop Gilbert Deya, is facing trial in Kenya charged with stealing a baby.

Kenyan authorities are also seeking extradition of her London- based husband over claims he traffics children from the slums of Nairobi.

Scotland Yard is investigating allegations the church recruits infertile couples who are then made to believe they have given birth through the power of prayer.

The former pastor of the church in Liverpool resigned when the scandal broke, moving to a new city church and taking most of his 400-strong congregation with him.

But now a new preacher, Pastor Gabriel, has taken over the Gilbert Deya Ministries church in Kensington, and the sect is growing in strength in the city.

The communications director of the Church of England in Liverpool said practices at the church could be damaging to vulnerable people, and warned churchgoers to beware of harmful cults.

The Rev David Johnston said a charismatic leader was controlling the congregation and claims of miracles are symptomatic of a religious cult.

He said: “Some of the practices that are taking place in this church seem to be unusual and could be used to draw in vulnerable people.

“This place will be full of good people who just want to worship God, but if they are being taken advantage of in any way it should stop.”

When asked to comment Pastor Gabriel said: “Write whatever you have to write. The people will only read what God wants them to see.”

Source

(Listed if other than Religion News Blog, or if not shown above)
Liverpool Echo, UK
Dec. 29, 2005
Jessica Shaughnessy
icliverpool.icnetwork.co.uk
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Religion News Blog posted this on Friday December 30, 2005.
Last updated if a date shows here:

   

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