Mormon man gets $159,000 settlement in religious discrimination case

DALLAS — A Canadian aerospace company has agreed to pay a Mormon man $159,000 to settle a religious discrimination lawsuit, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced today.

In its lawsuit, filed in Dallas under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the EEOC said Montreal-based Bombardier Aerospace discriminated against former sales director Mike Kolman and then fired him for complaining about it.

According to the EEOC, a top company executive told Kolman that his religion was a detriment to his ability to sell business jets and that customers would be offended by his religious-based decision not to drink or smoke.

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Kolman, who was based in Atlanta and now lives in a Denver suburb, was fired eight days after he reported the comments to the company’s human resources department.

“It was an isolated and unique incident that does not reflect the culture or policies in place at Bombardier,” company spokeswoman George-Ann Rosenberg said. “Bombardier does not tolerate or condone discrimination of any type.”

The lawsuit was filed in Texas because the company has an office in the Dallas suburb of Richardson.

Source

(Listed if other than Religion News Blog, or if not shown above)
Associated Press, via the Houston Chronicle, USA
Apr. 18, 2005
www.chron.com
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Religion News Blog posted this on Tuesday April 19, 2005.
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