Sikhism Archive

You'll find articles about this subject in each of the items listed, even if the term does not necessarily occur within the headlines or descriptive text.

Sikh holy man wins right to libel action appeal

An Indian holy man who tried to sue a journalist and a newspaper which said he was an impostor has been granted the right to appeal an earlier decision to strike out his libel claim.

Sitting at the Court of Appeal today Lady Justice Smith approved an oral application to renew the appeal on behalf of His Holiness Sant Baba Jeet Singh Ji Maharaj.

The holy man – who heads the Nirmal Kutia Johal religious order – originally had his attempt to sue journalist Hardeep Singh and Eastern Media Group – owner of the Sikh Times – struck out at the High Court in May.

The action came over an article Singh wrote for The Sikh Times in August 2007 in which alleged – the libel claim suggested – the holy man was the leader of a cult and an impostor who had disturbed the peace in the Sikh community of High Wycombe and promoted blasphemy and the sexual exploitation and abuse of women.


Sikhs strive to keep language alive

There’s a lasting link between the 35-character alphabet used to write Punjabi and the Sikh religion.

The Sikh scriptures and the Punjabi language of many Sikhs were written in a script known as Gurmukhi. So to be fully initiated into the religion, you must know how to read it.

That has created a problem for the Sikh community of Livingston. Their children, many of whom speak only English, aren’t able to understand the temple’s priests — let alone some of their own family members.

The problem, increasingly common in many Sikh communities, is threatening to create a cultural, linguistic and religious divide between generations, said several local Sikhs and the Sikh media. It’s also a threat to the continuance of the religion among second- and third-generation Sikhs.
[…]

The movement isn’t confined to Livingston.

An article in the spring 2008 issue of The World Sikh News, a San Jose-based weekly newspaper, warned that the loss of knowledge of the Gurmukhi alphabet was widespread — and not just in the U.S.

Nanak Singh “Nishte” wrote that not only were huge numbers of Sikhs in India illiterate, but many others were learning to read other scripts instead of Gurmukhi.
[…more…]

– Source / Full Story: Sikhs strive to keep language alive, Jonah Owen Lamb, Merced Sun-star via the Fresno Bee, Jan. 3, 2010 — Summarized by Religion News Blog