Tony Alamo Archive

You'll find articles about this subject in each of the items listed, even if the term does not necessarily occur within the headlines or descriptive text.

Research resources: Apologetics Index entry on Tony Alamo / Alamo Christian Ministries

Imprisoned evangelist Tony Alamo in poor health

The lawyer for an imprisoned evangelist convicted of taking young girls across state lines for sex says his client was hospitalized for about two weeks but has since been released.

The Texarkana Gazette says

Tony Alamo’s waning health was mentioned Friday at a pretrial hearing in a civil lawsuit filed by former members of his controversial ministry.

The Associated Press writes that

The hearing was related to a civil lawsuit by six women who say Alamo took them as child “brides” and a seventh woman who says she was being groomed as his bride before she escaped his ministry in Fouke.

Tony Alamo is serving a 175-year sentence in federal prison for taking little girls as young as 9 across state lines to have sex with them.

Last September a federal magistrate upheld a $66 million judgment against Alamo for abuse suffered by two boys while they were being reared in his ministry.

Judge denies Tony Alamo attorney’s request to halt civil lawsuit

A federal judge has denied defense requests to halt proceedings in a civil lawsuit filed by former wives of Tony Alamo.

The Texarkana Gazette, quoted at TonyAlamoNews.com, says

The suit was filed in August 2010 by six women who testified against him at his July 2009 criminal trial. Alamo was convicted of bringing five women he wed as children across state lines for sex. Later that year, Alamo was sentenced to 175 years in federal prison. He has been ordered to pay $250,000 in restitution to each of the five women.

The original petition also included a woman who testified she escaped from Alamo’s house while being groomed to be a wife. The civil suit was later amended to add a former wife who left the ministry and Alamo after Alamo’s conviction and after the suit was filed. […]

Lawyers representing individuals and businesses accused of knowing about and allowing Alamo to sexually abuse young girls asked U.S. District Judge Paul K. Holmes to stay the case amid concerns the defendants are targets of an active criminal investigation by the government.

Cited as evidence of such an investigation in a motion filed by Alamo’s attorney, John Wesley Hall of Little Rock, is an Oct. 11 visit to Alamo Ministry properties in Fouke, Ark., by a U.S. Attorney’s Office financial investigator.

“A representative of the USAO stated that the investigator was there for restitutionary purposes, but defendants theorize that the investigator may, in fact, have been there to collect information which could be used to prosecute others for what happened on those properties,” Holmes’ order states.

Hall’s motion also points to the government’s refusal to provide certain documents requested by defendants as support for the pending criminal investigation theory.

In his analysis of the request, Holmes notes the suit alleges violations of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act. The TVPRA allows the government to intervene and request a stay of a civil suit in a case it plans to prosecute criminally, Holmes’ order states.

But Holmes ruled that the law does not permit civil defendants to request a halt to proceedings in cases it speculates may be the subject of a criminal investigation.

“If such evidence were able to subject a civil case to an automatic stay, victims bringing actions under the TVPRA could often be denied justice, having their trial delayed indefinitely by a civil defendant who merely theorizes that an investigation might possibly be ongoing. Such an application of the statute would be nonsensical. …” Holmes wrote. […]

The case is scheduled for trial next year.

Tony Alamo is serving a 175-year sentence in federal prison for taking little girls as young as 9 across state lines to have sex with them.

Last September a federal magistrate upheld a $66 million judgment against Alamo for abuse suffered by two boys when they were being reared in his ministry.