Category: The Body

Sect topic of TV magazine

Coming up on Dateline In a Dateline/Court TV exclusive, Keith Morrison reports on a bizarre legal drama in which parents, who belonged to a fanatical religious group, stand trial for the murder of their baby. Had the group’s strange religious beliefs led to this murder? And if so, who was ultimately to blame?– SUNDAY, MAY 16, 7:00 p.m. ET Research resources on The Body ATTLEBORO — The bizarre case of the Attleboro religious sect in which a sect baby was starved to death because his parents believed they were fol lowing orders from God will be featured Sunday night on

Cult lawyer calls verdict just

ATTLEBORO — No jury in the country would have convicted Karen Robidoux of murder once they learned what life was like for the former Attleboro religious sect member, her attorney told a local lawyers’ group Thursday night. “There wasn’t legal trickery here. That was a just verdict,” Brockton defense lawyer Joseph Krowksi Sr. said of the jury’s decision to acquit Robidoux of second-degree murder in the starvation death of her son, Samuel. Robidoux, 28, however, was found guilty of assault and battery and sentenced to the time she already had served in jail before trial. She is now free and

Police keep eye out for Attleboro cult’s children

Friday, March 5, 2004 Cops keeping tabs on an Attleboro cult involved in the deaths of at least two children say they would move to rescue any new babies born into the brainwashing sect. “Personally I have a concern that if there are kids born that they would be subject to harm,” Detective Arthur Brillon said. “I feel it would be my duty to call (the Department of Social Services).” The Body In early press reports, The Body was referred to generically as the “Attleboro cult” or “Attleboro sect.” The group’s doctrines and practices have been heavily influenced by the

Robidoux recovering

LAKEVILLE — When Attleboro religious sect member Michelle Mingo was set free last week, she left court wearing the familiar jumper dress worn by sect women and resumed life in the sect home on Knight Avenue. But Karen Robidoux, who was convicted Feb. 3 of assault and battery in the starvation death of her son, remains at Meadow Haven, where she is continuing exit counseling after severing herself from the insular sect known as “The Body.” Ex-cult Support Resources Ex-cult Counseling Resources Learn more about cults at the Apologetics Index Cult FAQ “Karen is doing pretty good,” said her counselor,

Obedience to cruelty

The jury that decided the fate of Karen E. Robidoux was handed a difficult case. Ms. Robidoux, a former member of an Attleboro-area religious sect, was accused of second-degree murder in the 1999 starvation of her infant son, Samuel. The child died after a sect member claimed to have had a religious vision decreeing that he be fed only breast milk. The Body In early press reports, The Body was referred to generically as the “Attleboro cult” or “Attleboro sect.” The group’s doctrines and practices have been heavily influenced by the teachings of Carol Balizet’s Home in Zion Ministries The

Woman admits role in child’s death

TAUNTON — Michelle Mingo, the woman whose prophecy led to the starvation murder of her baby nephew, yesterday acknowledged her role in his death before walking out of court with her “spiritual husband,” apparently headed back to the Attleboro religious sect whose teachings cost Samuel Robidoux his life and Mingo custody of her five children. Mingo, 38, wearing the cobalt blue jumper required of female sect members, has been jailed since May 2000, initially for contempt of court for refusing to testify before a Bristol County grand jury investigating Samuel’s death. Bail of $50,000 was later set, but was never

Attleboro sect member pleads guilty to accessory charge in infant’s death

BOSTON — A member of an Attleboro religious sect whose self-described vision from God led to the starvation death of an infant pleaded guilty today to an accessory charge and was allowed to go free. G. Michelle Mingo changed her plea at a hearing in Taunton Superior Court. She pleaded guilty to two counts of being an accessory before the fact to an assault and battery on a child, the original charge against her. The Body In early press reports, The Body was referred to generically as the “Attleboro cult” or “Attleboro sect.” The group’s doctrines and practices have been

Sect member to plead guilty as accessory in baby’s starving death

BOSTON (AP) A member of a religious sect whose self-described vision from God led to the starvation death of an infant is expected to plead guilty to an accessory charge, the prosecutor in the case confirmed Monday. Michelle Mingo is scheduled to appear in Taunton Superior Court Tuesday afternoon for a change of plea hearing on a charge of being an accessory before the fact to an assault and battery on a child. Because Mingo has already been held in state custody for nearly four years, prosecutors will not recommend any additional prison time, Assistant District Attorney Walter Shea told

Freed ex-cult victim remains in Lakeville recovery center

LAKEVILLE — Karen Robidoux, the former Attleboro cult member convicted this week of assault and battery in the starvation death of her baby son Samuel, will take the next steps with her life in Lakeville. Since posting bail on the charges against her in October, the 28-year-old Robidoux has been a resident of Meadow Haven on Crooked Lane, a recovery center for people once under the influence of high-control organizations. Ex-cult Support Resources Ex-cult counseling and support resources Robidoux was sentenced Tuesday in Taunton District Court to two years in prison on a count of assault and battery, but was

Lawyer hopes case prompts more study of cults

ATTLEBORO — The lawyer for former Attleboro religious sect member Karen Robidoux said he hopes the case will spur more research into mind control and cults. Mind Control “Mind control” or “brainwashing” refers to the unethical use of persuasion methods with the aim of recruiting people into joining or remaining involved with a group, movement, or cause. Most cult apologists – people who defend cults – claim that mind control/brainwashing does not exist. “A remarkable thing about cult mind control is that it’s so ordinary in the tactics and strategies of social influence employed. They are variants of well-known social