Utah religious group Summum sues to display monument

After losing its case in federal court, a Utah religious group is now asking a state court judge to allow a monument in a Pleasant Grove city park.

The Associated Press says

Summum, a Gnostic Christianity-based sect, wants to erect its own display near an existing Ten Commandments monument. […]

In 2010, a federal judge dismissed a similar case from the group. The U.S. Supreme Court also previously ruled against the sect.

Summum — which was founded in 1975 and is headquartered in a pyramid-shaped temple — encourages some Egyptian practices, such as mummification.

The group insists that Pleasant Grove should provide it with equal space in a park that has a Ten Commandments monument. Summum wants to put up a marker listing its Seven Aphorisms.

When the Supreme Court in February 2009 turned down Summum’s demand for its religious monument, the court wrote:

A public park, over the years, can provide a soapbox for a very large number of orators—often, for all who want to speak—but it is hard to imagine how a public park could be opened up for the installation of permanent monuments by every person or group wishing to engage in that form of expression.

In June, 2010,

U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball ruled that Pleasant Grove has displayed the Ten Commandments monument “for reasons of history, not religion.” And there is no evidence city officials were aware of Summum’s religious beliefs and, therefore, were not favoring one religion over another when they refused its request to put up its Seven Aphorisms monument, he said.

The judge also dismissed a Utah constitutional claim without prejudice, meaning the suit could be refiled in state court — which is was Summum has now done.

Judge dismisses Summum request for equal space with Ten Commandments

A federal judge on Thursday tossed out a lawsuit by a Salt Lake City religious group seeking equal space for its own marker in a Pleasant Grove city park that has a Ten Commandments monument.

U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball ruled that Pleasant Grove has displayed the Ten Commandments monument “for reasons of history, not religion.” And there is no evidence city officials were aware of Summum‘s religious beliefs and, therefore, were not favoring one religion over another when they refused its request to put up its Seven Aphorisms monument, he said.

The decision did leave a door open for Summum, a small sect based on Gnostic Christianity. The judge threw out its claim on the merits for equal space under the federal Constitution but dismissed a Utah constitutional claim without prejudice, meaning the suit could be refiled in state court.

Brian Barnard, a Salt Lake City attorney for Summum, said the group is considering that option.
[…]

Summum — which was founded in 1975 and is headquartered in a pyramid-shaped temple — encourages some Egyptian practices, such as mummification. The religion’s aphorisms involve psychokinesis, correspondence, vibration, opposition, rhythm, cause and effect, and gender.
[…more…]

– Source / Full Story: Judge dismisses request for equal space with Ten Commandments, Pamela Manson, The Salt Lake Tribune, June 3, 2010 — Summarized by Religion News Blog

When the Supreme Court in February 2009 turned down Summum’s demand for its religious monument, the court wrote:

A public park, over the years, can provide a soapbox for a very large number of orators—often, for all who want to speak—but it is hard to imagine how a public park could be opened up for the installation of permanent monuments by every person or group wishing to engage in that form of expression.

U.S. Supreme Court turns down Summum sect’s demand for religious display

Summum The justices today unanimously overturned a ruling that required Pleasant Grove, Utah, to give equal access to Summum, a church that wants to display its “seven aphorisms.”

Writing for the court, Justice Samuel Alito said the Pleasant Grove monument represented “government speech,” exempting it from having to give private groups equal access under the Constitution’s free-speech clause. [Read more...]

Tiny sect believes God gave Moses Seven Aphorisms before giving the Ten Commandments

Summum Followers of Summum believe that Moses received two sets of tablets on Mount Sinai and that the Ten Commandments were on the second set. The aphorisms were on the first one.

The tiny sect — whose founder says says he learned the aphorisms during a series of telepathic encounters with divine beings he called Summa Individuals — wants them displayed in a public park.

On Wednesday, the US Supreme Court will hear their arguments. [Read more...]