Category: Church Universal and Triumphant

Elizabeth Clare Prophet, leader of sect that predicted nuclear Armageddon dies at 70

Elizabeth Clare Prophet Elizabeth Clare Prophet, the spiritual leader of the Church Universal and Triumphant, which gained notoriety in the late 1980s for its followers’ elaborate preparations for nuclear Armageddon, has died.

The church was still prepared for Armageddon in recent years and kept a bomb shelter stocked for 750 people deep in a forest near Yellowstone National Park.

In memoir, daughter of CUT leader comes to grips with where church went wrong

Erin Prophet The Lyons Press has just released “Prophet’s Daughter: My Life with Elizabeth Clare Prophet Inside the Church Universal and Triumphant,” which details Erin Prophet’s tumultuous life.

In the book’s preface, Prophet writes that one reason she penned the account is to expose the flawed thinking that led to her mother’s “apocalyptic prophecies” and the shelters built in their wake.

“Our actions were informed by the same sense of spiritual superiority that has led others to pace street corners with sandwich boards reading, THE END IS NEAR,” she wrote. “And the reasoning behind it is more similar to that of the other groups than I have been comfortable admitting.”

CUT undergoes change of perception

CORWIN SPRINGS – Last week, the Church Universal and Triumphant announced it is breaking ground on a new office building at its headquarters here. That’s not so unusual. Groups put up structures all the time. What is unusual is the contrast with what happened 15 years ago, when the church was wrapping up its last major construction project: a 756-person underground bomb shelter in a mountain meadow tucked into the upper reaches of the church’s sprawling Royal Teton Ranch. At that time, church members were constructing similar, if smaller, structures in Glastonbury, a Paradise Valley subdivision then limited to members

CUT copes with illness of leader, sect changes

Elizabeth Clare Prophet, at the age of 65, is suffering the sixth year of the ravages of Alzheimer’s Disease. “She’s continuing a slow decline,” Erin Prophet, her oldest daughter and co-guardian, said in a recent interview. It’s a sad, slow winding down of a woman whose life was always controversial, but never dull, who is still revered by thousands of people around the world as a spiritual leader with a direct link to God. She founded the Church Universal and Triumphant, an international New Age sect with its headquarters in Corwin Springs. She’s written dozens of books, had at least

Underground Shelters Abound in Paradise Valley

If nuclear war ever breaks out, here’s a suggestion on where to take cover. North of Yellowstone in a place called Paradise Valley there’s a remarkable number of places to hide underground. We visited two amazing underground structures in Paradise Valley. Each could hold a substantial community for the better part of a year. But we just barely scratched below the surface. In all there are about 30 big shelters, a hedge against “Doomsday in Paradise.” In the splendid scenery of Paradise Valley, you might overlook the clues: ventilation equipment, vault-like doors in hillsides, a watchtower that could double as

Seeker’s diary: Church Universal and Triumphant

It would take a book to explain the teachings of Church Universal and Triumphant. Specifically, it might take 55 books, the number published by members of this cross-denominational faith since its founding in 1958. Church Universal and Triumphant The Church Universal and Triumphant was the subject of a controversial, 1993 study by cult apologists James R. Lewis and J. Gordon Melton. The study is one of the items discussed by Stephen Kent and Therese Krebs in their article, “Alternative Religions and their Academic Supporters.” The Lewis and Melton study has been described by sociologist Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi as “made-to-order PR efforts,”

Bison didn’t gain much from CUT land deal

http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/ Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Mar. 7, 2003 By , Chronicle Staff Writer American taxpayers paid $13 million for land just north of Yellowstone National Park in the late 1990s, but it didn’t buy any breathing room for the bison trying to leave the park this winter. That’s because although the public gained a lot of land, cows remain too close to the park to let bison wander. Late in 1998, the Church Universal and Triumphant and the federal government announced they had worked out plans for the church to sell land or conservation easements on 5,000 acres along the park