This is our archive of news items tagged Al-Qaeda.

 memo You'll find articles about that subject in each of the items listed, even if the term does not necessarily occur within the headlines or descriptive text.

Category: Al-Qaeda

Al Qaeda Cell in Turkey Accused of Planning to Bomb Churches

Islam A large-scale Al Qaeda plot to bomb “all the churches in Ankara,” as well as the Turkish Parliament and U.S. Embassy in the Turkish capital, was made public today.

Prepared and filed by the Special Prosecutor’s Office in Ankara, the 50-page indictment outlined the militants’ revised “jihad” strategy to begin focusing their attacks against Turkey before waging war against the United States and other countries.

Sea burial of Osama bin Laden breaks sharia law, say Muslim scholars

Osama Bin Laden Osama bin Laden‘s burial at sea was quickly criticised by Muslim scholars who claimed it had breached sharia law and warned that it may provoke calls for revenge attacks against US targets.

Others used the sea burial question to question whether he was dead at all, with doubts fuelled by the absence of authentic photographs of his corpse.

Al-Qaida Magazine Aims To ‘Inspire’ Western Jihadis

This sounds just crazy enough to be real: Scans of a new glossy magazine started popping up online this week. Inspire features slick graphics, high-quality production and stories like “Make a Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom.” The first page also promises an editorial from Osama bin Laden himself, although due to technical issues, only three pages of the magazine are currently available.

Inspire is being published by a Yemen-based branch of al-Qaida, and it’s aimed at radicalizing an English-speaking audience. Al-Qaida has a well-established propaganda arm, but, as analyst Juan Zarate tells NPR host Guy Raz, Inspire marks its first major effort to reach out to English speakers.

Zarate is a former deputy national security adviser in the Bush administration and is currently a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He says that despite concerns about the authenticity of Inspire, he believes it genuinely does come from al-Qaida.

Who’s who in al-Qaeda

Shortly after the 11 September 2001 attacks, the US issued a list of al-Qaeda suspects. Some have now been captured or killed, and some new names have been added to those still at large. Few details about key figures have been officially released. BBC News Online pieces together what little is known about some of the key al-Qaeda suspects. At Large Osama Bin Laden Osama Bin Laden is the man the US accuses of masterminding the 11 September suicide hijackings and other attacks on US interests. He has been indicted for the 1998 US embassy bombings in East Africa and

Hate Groups: Al Qaeda calls on Muslims to fight Israel

Al Qaeda No. 2 tells Muslims in Lebanon, ‘We will stand with you’ DOHA, Qatar (CNN) — With a poster of the burning World Trade Center behind him, Osama bin Laden‘s top lieutenant appeared on tape Thursday calling on Muslims to join the fight against Israel and “rise up seeking martyrdom and attack the crusaders and Zionists.” The video of Ayman al-Zawahiri aired on Al-Jazeera. He likened the battles in Lebanon and Gaza to al Qaeda’s battle against the West and called on Muslims to wage “jihad in the name of God.” He did not specifically mention Hezbollah, which is

German Security Chief: Al Qaeda Harder to Fight

Terrorists work more independently and are harder to catch, security experts say On the first anniversary of the London bombings, Germany’s top security official says that it is even more difficult these days to stop terrorist attacks because Al-Qaeda has split into tiny autonomous cells. Al Qaeda has splintered off into countless autonomous Islamist cells, creating a tricky moving target for law enforcement, Germany’s domestic intelligence service chief said Thursday. “They are apparently no longer in a position to plan attacks or lead operations like we saw on Sept. 11,” Heinz Fromm said in an interview with AFP news service

Al-Qaeda bid to infiltrate MI5

Al-Qaeda sympathisers have been trying to infiltrate the British security service MI5, the BBC has learned. Whitehall officials confirmed what some had long suspected, says BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner. But those with al-Qaeda sympathies were weeded out during a six to eight-month vetting process, officials added. Meanwhile anti-terrorism police probing the 7 July London bombings say people who knew the attacks were being planned would face prosecution. ‘Richer picture’ Officers at a Scotland Yard briefing said they continued to be very concerned by the intelligence picture, with 70 investigations continuing and some of the information received described as “very