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The law and Guantanamo

The New York Times, USA
Nov. 11, 2004 Editorial
www.iht.com

ReligionNewsBlog.com • Thursday November 11, 2004

A prosecution before the first U.S. military commission since World War II was halted this week, just as it was getting started, by a federal judge in Washington who ruled that the proceedings lacked the basic elements of a fair trial and violated the Geneva Conventions. It was the latest in a series of court decisions that have taken the Bush administration to task for trampling on the law in the name of fighting terrorists. The administration should bring its policies into compliance with law.

America’s Double Standards

While George Bush claims to be a Christian, he lies about Iraq, tramples human rights, violates international law, and destroys civil rights.

“Differing weights and differing measures– the LORD detests them both.” (Proverbs 20:10 NIV)

Salim Ahmed Hamdan, a former driver for Osama bin Laden who was taken captive in Afghanistan, was to be tried as a war criminal before the newly created military commission at Guantanamo. Under the legal regime set up by the Bush administration, these tribunals lack the procedural safeguards of a court-martial.

In his ruling, Judge James Robertson of U.S. District Court in Washington held that Hamdan cannot be tried in this kind of a stripped-down proceeding. The Geneva Conventions, which the United States has signed, require a court-martial for any detainee who is a prisoner of war, or whose status is in doubt. At a court-martial, defendants have a far greater ability to see, and challenge, the prosecution’s evidence.

The administration argues that Hamdan is not entitled to be treated as a POW because he worked for Al Qaeda, not a traditional army, and that the president’s declaration to that effect was enough to deny him the protection of the Geneva Conventions. Judge Robertson, however, disagreed. Article 5 of the Third Geneva Convention says prisoners can be denied POW status only by a competent tribunal. Robertson said the administration did not give Hamdan the sort of proceeding that would be necessary to deny him his rights.

The Bush administration has a history of flouting the law, and the treaties to which the United States is a signatory, as part of the so-called war on terror. It argued, until the Supreme Court ruled otherwise in June, that the detainees in Guantanamo had no right to challenge their confinement.

For now, the administration says it will appeal this week’s ruling, which could set the stage for another Supreme Court decision that it has gone too far.

Meanwhile, America’s image abroad will take another beating, and its soldiers will be in even greater danger in the future of being denied Geneva Convention protections should they be captured. The administration should drop the appeal and concentrate instead on upgrading its flawed policies.

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