Thompson Center To Get Scientology Exhibit

CHICAGO (AP) — Reversing an earlier ruling, the state is allowing a controversial exhibit to be erected at the Thompson Center by a group affiliated with the Church of Scientology.

Scientology: a dangerous Hate Group
The Citizens Commission on Human Rights is a Scientology front organization that fights against alleged abuses in psychiatry and psychology. As Scientology critic Martin Poulter points out, “It is absolutely remarkable that an organisation which stands accused of so many human rights violations itself should spawn a pressure group with this name.”
“The German government considers the Scientology organization a commercial enterprise with a history of taking advantage of vulnerable individuals and an extreme dislike of any criticism. The government is also concerned that the organization’s totalitarian structure and methods may pose a risk to Germany’s democratic society. Several kinds of evidence have influenced this view of Scientology, including the organization’s activities in the United States.”
- German government’s view of Scientology
Scientology’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, condoned and encouraged unethical behavior – including the hate and harassment activities Scientology is known for
Lying, deception, and other unethical behavior is part and parcel of Scientology, condoned and encouraged in the cult’s scriptures

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights ‘ exhibit blasts psychiatry as a wicked profession that “spawned the ideology which fired Hitler’s mania … and created the Holocaust.”

Officials announced on Monday that they had decided to allow the exhibit to return to the downtown building after discussing the matter with state lawyers.

The group erected the photographic display in the state building on Dec. 1 but was ordered to dismantle it less than 24 hours later after people complained that the exhibit spread misinformation and violated the separation of church and state, officials said.

While the exhibit did refer to the group’s Scientology ties, the state’s lawyers have determined that it did not have religious overtones.

Marla Filidei, international vice president of the Citizens Commission, said the state’s change of heart was a victory for 1st Amendment rights.

“We were prepared to go as far as need be to ensure that justice was done in this case,” she said.

“The state was very misguided in its initial decision. The exhibit is what it portrays itself to be and nothing more than that.”

The exhibit is expected to return to the building for a week, beginning on Jan. 5, Central Management Services spokeswoman Pam Davies said.

The main focus of the museum-like display of photographs was alleged abuses of psychiatric patients.

The American Psychiatric Association has said the group’s charges aren’t based on science.

The Church of Scientology was founded in 1954 by the late science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, who contends that technology can expand the mind and solve problems.

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