‘Witch torture’ trial: Attack on teenager was ‘feral’

Violence inflicted on a teenager accused of being a witch was “wild” and “completely feral”, a witchcraft expert has told the Old Bailey.

The BBC reports

Kristy Bamu, 15, drowned in a bath in his sister’s east London flat after he was was beaten and tortured in 2010.

Magalie Bamu and Eric Bikubi, both aged 28 and from Newham, deny murder.

Expert Dr Richard Hoskins said the attack went way beyond accepted practices in Democratic Republic of Congo, where the family originate from.

He told the jury: “In this case the evidence that I’ve read is something completely feral, it’s wild, it’s completely out of control. It’s beyond the normal patterns that exist in the Congo.”

Ms Bamu and her boyfriend Mr Bikubi are accused of murdering Kristy on Christmas Day because they thought he was affected by an “evil force called kindoki”. […]

[Dr. Hoskins said] that over the last 15 years the “child witch phenomenon” has emerged where children were accused of being possessed. He said belief in kindoki was “all pervasive” in Congolese society regardless of someone’s standard of education or social class.

“It’s absolutely standard regrettably to accuse a child in the DRC of having witchcraft… nobody would raise an eyebrow at the suggestion in the DRC.”

Earlier this month the BBC explained

Kristy and four of his siblings had gone to stay with their sister at her flat in December 2010.

While they were there, she and her partner Mr Bikubi accused them of being witches and trying to control another child, the jury heard.

Mr Bikubi found a pair or urine-soaked underwear in the flat’s kitchen, and Kristy admitted that he had wet himself.

This triggered an outpouring of violence by Mr Bikubi, who believed the incident was due to witchcraft, the jury heard.

The Press Association says

Dr Hoskins told the court that Kristy wetting himself could have been the trigger for the alleged violence. He said: “The trigger that needs to occur for people to think someone is possessed by kindoki can be anything out of the ordinary. Bed-wetting is a classic example of this.”

Other factors could have been Kristy’s older brother Yves’ autism, an allergic reaction that made Yves’ lip swell or their younger brother having problems getting out of bed, the court heard.

Note: Our Witchcraft news tracker includes news items about a wide variety of diverse movements reported in the media as related to, or involved in, ‘witchcraft.’ It also includes news articles on the plight of alleged witches.

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