More videos: Scientology induction video back online

A Scientology orientation film which accuses the US Government spending millions on mind control techniques and attempting to “steal” church founder L. Ron Hubbard‘s work has reappeared online.

The grainy 36-minute video, entitled Orientation: A Scientology Information Film, appeared to have been uploaded after being captured by a handheld camera from inside one of the church’s introductory sessions.

It has previously been removed by websites such as YouTube following complaints from the church.


A Church of Scientology spokesman told NEWS.com.au the film was produced for anyone wanting an introduction to the religion, but was “stolen” and posted online anyway.

In the video, a man introduced as the trustee of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s estate, Norman Starkey, said the US Government was after the secrets of “dianetics” before the author even published a book on it.

“The government knew that it worked and wanted it for themselves to monopolise the field of the mind,” Mr Starkey said.

“They even tried to force Ron to surface – he refused and instead gave his discoveries to the public.

“The government had been spending millions of dollars experimenting with mind control, all in a grand scheme to make men more suggestible… but dianetics could undo their efforts to bend men’s minds and brainwash them.”

Mr Starkey also said the government spent “decades” trying to stop Hubbard’s work from becoming popular.

The video also featured testimonials from Hollywood actors John Travolta and Kirstie Alley.

Consumer Alert: Scientology Quackery

“Scientology is evil; its techniques are evil; its practice is a serious threat to the community, medically, morally, and socially; and its adherents are sadly deluded and often mentally ill… (Scientology is) the world’s largest organization of unqualified persons engaged in the practice of dangerous techniques which masquerade as mental therapy.”
– Justice Anderson, Supreme Court of Victoria, Australia, quoted atWhat judges have to say about Scientology

At the end of the film, the narrator said it was up to the viewer to decide whether they wanted to become Scientologists, just like it was their choice if they committed suicide.

“If you leave this room after seeing this film, and walk out and never mention Scientology again, you are perfectly free to do so,” the narrator said.

“It would be stupid, but you can do it. You can also dive off a bridge or blow your brains out: that is your choice.

“But, if you… continue with Scientology, we will be very happy with you – and you will be very happy with you.”

According to IMDB.com, the film was created in 1996 by the Church of Scientology.

Source

(Listed if other than Religion News Blog)
News.com.au, Australia
Jan. 22, 2008
Mark Schliebs
www.news.com.au

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This post was last updated: Nov. 8, 2013