Holy Land purchase by Trinity was complex deal

Holy Land Experience‘s transfer to Trinity Broadcasting Network was a complex deal involving five nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations: Holy Land Ministries, Trinity and the Grace, Van Kampen and Sola Scriptura foundations.

The three foundations are all controlled by the family of the late Robert Van Kampen, a longtime financial backer of Holy Land.

According to Trinity’s attorney, Colby May, the $37million payment was divided this way:

TBN: The Blasphemy Network

Trintiy Broadcasting Network (TBN), led by founders Paul and Jan Crouch, is the world’s largest religious TV network. It claims to be a Christian ministry. However, while some legitimate ministries and teachers (those who adhere to the orthodox teachings and practices of historical Christianity) appear on TBN, the network promotes such an incredible amount of heretical material – including extremist Word-Faith teachings – that it is often referred to as “The Blasphemy Network.”

  • $8million went to repay the Grace Foundation for money it had lent Holy Land over the years.
  • $12million went to Sola Scriptura for 10 acres of vacant land across from the 15-acre theme park on Conroy Road.

    Trinity plans to use the vacant property to build a broadcast facility for local Christian television station WTGL-Channel52, whose license Trinity purchased last year for $50million. Federal Communications Commission rules required the billion-dollar broadcasting network to operate local facilities for the new station.

  • $17million was donated to a new foundation, a successor to Holy Land Ministries called The Master’s Gate.

    Scott Pierre, former chairman of Holy Land Ministries and son-in-law of Robert Van Kampen, became chairman of the Master’s Gate Foundation. That sum represents much if not all of what the Van Kampen family and its foundations have contributed to Holy Land since its conception.

Mark I. Pinsky, Sentinel researcher Susan Thompson

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