Jim Carrey, Pastors’ Wives, and Bible Quoting Bosses

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“RNB Clippings” is a collection of clippings, snippets, links, commentary and other items that, in one way or another, relate to the topics normally covered in Religion News Blog.


The Spiritual Side of Jim Carrey

Glenn Whipp, Film Writer for The San Bernardino Sun, talked with Jim Carrey about the new movie, “The Number 23,” but “the conversation took a left turn, with Carrey revealing the source of his contentment these days, a live-in-the-moment spirituality that he says blocks out the pressures of a Hollywood career.”

Q: Are you a religious guy?

A: I’m a spiritual guy, not a religious guy. I believe in taking truth from whatever source you find it, and if it fits like a pair of old shoes and you feel like you’ve known it for your whole life when you hear it, then it’s the truth.

Organizations … they become corrupt sooner or later and have to protect themselves to convince people to believe in them.

Q: I know. I saw “The Da Vinci Code.”

A: Yeah right. I just go through life. One of my passions since I was a little kid was to learn the secrets of the universe. So I read a lot of different philosophies and I take the things that generally cross over in all of them.

Q: Some would say such a smorgasbord approach dilutes the truth.

A: Not me. When it comes to Jesus, you know, he said a lot of incredibly impactful, wonderful things that were amazing and completely misunderstood for the most part. Somebody might not understand “nobody gets to heaven but through me.” They might take it literally. I believe it means “by loving like I love and forgiving like I forgive.”

Q: Not everyone would peg you as a spiritual seeker.

A: I love it. I was down in Malibu one day, getting some ice cream, and I ran into a bunch of kids from Pepperdine who were studying theology. And we just got into this deep debate about all these things from the Bible, like original sin. It’s fascinating.

Q: Does the spirituality provide some refuge from the pressures of Hollywood?

A: It’s been incredibly helpful. I used to think that the parts I did or the fame would define me and someday complete me. After a while, I understood that those things could be crossed off the list of things that will do that. I wish everybody fame and fortune so they can cross it off the list and move on to something else.
– Source: Glenn Whipp, The spiritual side of Jim Carrey, San Bernardino Sun, Feb. 17, 2007

The pick-and-choose approach to spirituality is sometimes referred to as Cafeteria Religion.


Pastors’ Wives Move Beyond The Front Pew

Religion News Service notes a trend in black US churches in which pastors’ “wives have taken on new congregational roles, including that of co-pastor.”

Experts point to social, cultural and theological reasons for the evolving roles and title changes of black pastors’ wives.

Some relate the changes to the professionalization of the black middle class, which is seen in some African American megachurches. Wives of pastors in those churches often hold top administrative jobs, write their own books and keep their own calendars of speaking engagements.

The Rev. Shelley Henderson, organizer of the First Ladies Summit, points to the overall empowerment of women, as reflected by the election of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and by New York Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s run for the White House.

“I think it has more to do with limits . . . being taken off women in general,” Henderson said.

Robinson’s husband points to the theological emphasis in some charismatic circles, where the focus is more on the Bible and Jesus and less on males and females, rich and poor.

“That message liberated women and liberated couples,” Kenneth Robinson said of the Word of Faith movement, to which he and his wife belong. They are affiliated with movement leader Creflo A. Dollar.

The trend seems more present among independent churches — black as well as white and Hispanic — but can be found in traditional denominations, too.
– Source: Adele M. Banks, Pastors’ Wives Move Beyond The Front Pew, Religion News Service via the Washington Post

It should be noted that the Word of Faith movement is very controversial within Christian churches, as much of its theology and many of its practices are unbiblical, to say the least.

That said, there have long been discussions in the church regarding women in ministry. It is an issue on which many Christians and Christian denominations disagree, but the discussion does not involve Christianity’s central doctrines.


Bible Quoting Boss

In her syndicated column, Your Office Coach, workplace coach Mary G. McIntyre offers advice to someone whose boss constantly quotes Bible verses:

Your recourse in this situation depends on the size of the business. In a larger company, human relations will be concerned about possible charges of religious discrimination, so you should take your situation to that department.

But if you’re in a small business and the offensive manager is the owner, then you’re pretty much out of luck. You will need to control your irritation.

When your boss answers policy questions with Biblical quotations, listen politely and then say, “I’m not sure that I understand the company’s policy on that issue. Could you clarify it for me?” And silently remind yourself that once you graduate, you will be able to escape this proselytizing manager.
– Source: Mary G. McIntyre, Bible-quoting boss may have to be tolerated, McClathy-Tribune News Service via the Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 18, 2007

Mary G. McIntyre heads Your Office Coach, and is the author of the book, Secrets to Winning at Office Politics.

See also our collection of items regarding religion in the workplace.

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Religion News Blog, Netherlands
Feb. 20, 2007
Anton and Janet Hein-Hudson
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This post was last updated: Jul. 31, 2007