No harm in Navajos’ peyote use, study finds

[Ad] Planning a vacation or trip? Book activities and Skip-The-Line tickets here.

BOSTON — A study of the effects of peyote on American Indians found no evidence that the hallucinogenic cactus caused brain damage or psychological problems among people who used it frequently in religious ceremonies.

In fact, researchers from Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital found that members of the Native American Church performed better on some psychological tests than other Navajos who did not regularly use peyote.

A 1994 federal law allows roughly 300,000 members of the Native American Church to use peyote as a religious sacrament. The five-year study set out to find scientific proof for the Navajos’ belief that the substance, which contains the hallucinogen mescaline, is not hazardous to their health even when used frequently.

The study was conducted among Navajos in the Southwest by McLean psychiatrist John Halpern.

It compared test results for 60 church members who have used peyote at least 100 times against those for 79 Navajos who do not regularly use peyote and 36 tribe members with a history of alcohol abuse but minimal peyote use.

Those who had abused alcohol fared worse on the tests than the church members, according to the study.

Church members believe peyote offers spiritual and physical healing, but the researchers could not say with any certainty that peyote’s pharmacological effects were responsible for their test results.

“It’s hard to know how much of it is the sense of community they get from the religion and how much of it is the actual experience of using the medication itself,” said Harrison Pope, the study’s senior author and director of the biological psychology laboratory at the hospital.

“We find no evidence that a history of peyote use would compromise the psychological or cognitive abilities of these individuals,” the researchers wrote in their paper published today in Biological Psychiatry.

Possibly Related Products

Source

(Listed if other than Religion News Blog)
AP, via TheNewsTribune.com, USA
Nov. 4, 2005
Michael Kunzelman
www.thenewstribune.com

More About This Subject

This post was last updated: Jan. 7, 2009